General Physics 1

General Physics 1

Code: 51508
ECTS: 10.0
Lecturers in charge: prof. dr. sc. Miroslav Požek - Lectures
doc. dr. sc. Nikola Poljak - Lectures
Lecturers: Filip Erhardt - Exercises
Marko Jerčić - Exercises
Take exam: Studomat
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1. komponenta

Lecture typeTotal
Lectures 60
Exercises 30
Seminar 15
* Load is given in academic hour (1 academic hour = 45 minutes)
Description:
COURSE GOALS: Course goals are to acquire theoretical and experimental knowledge of the basics of mechanics and physics of fluids, gaining operational knowledge of the methods for solving numerical problems in mechanics and physics of fluids, and achieving skills of reducing the real mechanical problems to a physical model, with setting up the appropriate equations.

LEARNING OUTCOMES AT THE LEVEL OF THE PROGRAMME:
1. KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
1.1 formulate and interpret the basic laws of physics including mechanics, electromagnetism and thermodynamics
2. APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
2.1 develop a way of thinking that allows the student to set the model or to recognize and use the existing models in the search for solutions to specific physical and analog problems
2.2 recognize analogies in the situations that are physically different, as well as in the situations analogous to the physical ones, as well as applying known solutions when solving new problems
5. LEARNING SKILLS
5.1 consult professional literature independently as well as other relevant sources of information, which implies a good knowledge of English as a language of professional communication


LEARNING OUTCOMES SPECIFIC FOR THE COURSE:
Upon passing the course on General physics 1, the student will be able to:
- develop a simple physical model applicable to solving a given problem in mechanics and fluid mechanics;
- set mathematical formulation of a given physical model in mechanics;
- solve numerical tasks for known systems in mechanics and fluid mechanics;
- demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts of kinematics, and in particular the concepts of speed and acceleration;
- demonstrate knowledge of Newton's laws, the Galilean transformations, and the law of conservation of energy and momentum;
- demonstrate basic knowledge of kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies, including the conditions of equilibrium and rotation around fixed axis;
- qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of the harmonic oscillator;
- qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of bodies in the field of inverse square force;
- demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts of fluid mechanics, which includes the most important phenomena and statics (hydrostatic pressure, buoyancy) and fluid dynamics (continuity equation, Bernoulli equation).
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Lectures per weeks (15 weeks in total):
Week 1: the physical quantities, dimensions and units. Mathematical tools.
Week 2: coordinate systems. Description of motion: velocity and acceleration.
Week 3: examples of simple movements. Relative speed.
Week 4: Newton's laws.
Week 5: forces: gravitational, electrical, magnetic, elastic, frictional.
Week 6: free-body diagrams and equations of motion. Examples: hanged body, sliding, incline.
Week 7: examples: motion of a body in fluids and of charge in a homogeneous magnetic field.
Week 8: the relativity of motion. Inertial systems.
Week 9: non-inertial systems. Fictitious (or inertial) forces.
Week 10: work, kinetic and potential energy. Power.
Week 11: the laws of conservation of energy, momentum and angular momentum. Collisions.
Week 12: statics and dynamics of rigid bodies.
Week 13: the harmonic oscillator: definition and basic examples.
Week 14: the forces that decrease with the square of the distance.
Week 15: fluid mechanics (statics and dynamics).

Exercises follow lectures by content:
Week 1: repetition of mathematics necessary for the course.
Week 2: coordinate systems. Description of motion: velocity and acceleration.
Week 3: examples of simple movements. Relative speed.
Week 4: Newton's laws.
Week 5: forces: free-body diagrams and equations of motion.
Week 6: the movement of the body under the influence of forces: hanged body, sliding, incline.
Week 7: examples: motion of a body in fluids and of charge in a homogeneous magnetic field.
Week 8: the relativity of motion. Inertial systems.
Week 9: non-inertial systems. Fictitious (or inertial) forces.
Week 10: work, kinetic and potential energy. Power.
Week 11: the laws of conservation of energy, momentum and angular momentum. Collisions.
Week 12: statics and dynamics of rigid bodies.
Week 13: the harmonic oscillator: definition and basic examples.
Week 14: the forces that decrease with the square of the distance.
Week 15: fluid mechanics (statics and dynamics).

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS:
Students are required to regularly attend lectures, seminars and exercises, and actively participate in solving problems during exercises. Furthermore, students are required to pass two colloquiums and four tests during the semester, and to achieve at least 33% of the total number of points on them.

GRADING AND ASSESSING THE WORK OF STUDENTS:
The final exam consists of written and oral examinations, final score is the average value of grades obtained on each of them. Additional points can be achieved by successful solving homework assignments and prize tasks. Written exam can be replaced by a successful solving of two colloquiums.
Literature:
  1. H.D. Young and R.A. Freedman, Sears and Zemansky's UNIVERSITY PHYSICS, Pearson, 14th edition, 2015
  2. D. Kleppner nad R. Kolenkow, AN INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS, Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition, 2014
  3. C. Kittel, W.D. Knight, and M.A. Ruderman: Mehanika (Udžbenik fizike Sveučilišta u
    Berkeleyu), Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb 1982.
  4. Richard Feynman: Lectures in Physics I, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1964
1. semester
Mandatory course - Mandatory studij - Physics
Consultations schedule:

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